Bone Broth

Homemade broth or “stock” is a powerful food as it’s easily digestible, helps heal the lining of your gut, and contains valuable nutrients that promote healing throughout your body.

The gelatin found in bone broth is a hydrophilic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thereby supporting proper digestion.

Bone broth also reduces joint pain and inflammation courtesy of chondroitin sulfates, glucosamine, and other compounds extracted from the boiled down cartilage.

Amino acids such as glycine, proline, and arginine in bone broth all have anti-inflammatory effects, and bone broth contains high amounts of calcium, magnesium, and other nutrients that play an important role in healthy bone formation. You can learn how to make your own below:

Many people have memories of coming together on Sundays to share a meal with their family. If you’re lucky, you may still do this today, and if you do, you know that part of the allure is waiting while the various pots simmer on the stove, filling your home with the scent of the home-cooked meal to come.

Today, I want to share with you a recipe that is the perfect complement to your Sunday meals… although really you can make it any day of the week. It’s a recipe for bone broth, and it’s one that is highly nourishing for both your body and your soul.

While the recipe calls for lengthy simmering (about 24-72 hours), the actual preparation time is very short, making this a meal that even those who are time-crunched can prepare. If you’re fighting off a cold or the flu, homemade bone broth is excellent for speeding healing and recuperation from illness.

But far beyond this, broth or “stock” is a powerful food as it’s easily digestible, helps heal the lining of your gut, and contains valuable nutrients that promote healing throughout your body.

Bone Broth


· 3-4 pounds beef marrow and knuckle bones

· 2 pounds meaty bones such as short ribs

· ½ cup raw apple cider vinegar

· 4 quarts filtered water

· 3 celery stalks, halved

· 3 carrots, halved

· 3 onions, quartered

· Handful of fresh parsley

· Sea salt


1. Place bones in a pot or a crockpot, add apple cider vinegar and water, and let the mixture sit for 1 hour so the vinegar can leach the mineral out of the bones.

2. Add more water if needed to cover the bones.

3. Add the vegetables bring to a boil and skim the scum from the top and discard.

4. Reduce to a low simmer, cover, and cook for 24-72 hours (if you’re not comfortable leaving the pot to simmer overnight, turn off the heat and let it sit overnight, then turn it back on and let simmer all day the next day)

5. During the last 10 minutes of cooking, throw in a handful of fresh parsley for added flavor and minerals.

6. Let the broth cool and strain it, making sure all marrow is knocked out of the marrow bones and into the broth.

7. Add sea salt to taste and drink the broth as is or store in fridge up to 5 to 7 days or freezer up to 6 months for use in soups or stews.

How to Make Bone Broth Using Your Slow Cooker

Bone broth is an example of a traditional food that’s easily adaptable to your modern lifestyle. Even if you’re away from home most of the day, you can still prepare homemade bone broth by using a slow cooker. To use a slow cooker, you will need to first bring the broth to a boil in a pot on your stove, then skim the scum off the top. Pay careful attention to this stage, as once the broth begins to boil the scum is rolled right back into the broth. The scum are the impurities that you want to remove. You can then transfer the broth to your slow cooker and turn it on to low heat for 24 to 72 hours.

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